Tag Archives: video

Kick it with Korilla

Kicking it with Korilla from Amanda Tien on Vimeo.

Busy dealing with Sandy?  Watch the Korilla video and get excited for the rain to stop so the truck can come back and hang out on campus.  Until then, dream of kimchi and gogo gui wrapped up in a delicious burrito.

Some of you may know that I’m starting a food magazine with Manon called THE CULINARIAN (and if you don’t know, then you should get excited because it’s going to be great).  Our main feature is about Korilla BBQ and its founder, Eddie Song (a 2008 Columbia grad).  As part of my research and photography-gathering, I was allowed to go on one of the Korilla trucks!  Naturally, I geeked out, as any self-respecting foodie at Columbia would.  I was welcomed onto the truck by Tae Lee, Mitch Wong, and James “Vanilla Rice” Jung (loving the moniker) just before the lunch rush hour.

I won’t get too much into describing Korilla lest I give away the most exciting parts of my feature, but I will say that Korilla is a great local establishment.  Korilla, despite being on wheels, is a great standard on the Morningside Heights dining scene.  Korilla is here for lunch on Thursdays and for dinner Monday through Friday underneath the SIPA bridge (117th and Amsterdam).  Walk by the east side of campus and you are sure to smell the fantastic scent of grilled beef and succulent chicken both well doused in a finely-tuned marinade.   Continue reading Kick it with Korilla

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Fika Fridays: What the Fika?

 

For Amanda’s first post of the season, she will spend the italics section of her post feeling a strange, out-of-body experience as she briefly wonders if her life is being narrated by herself  OR Amanda explains what she means by fika.

Last spring, I read a magazine article that talked about how, in Sweden, people take “fika” breaks.  Fika roughly means “to drink coffee with friends on a small break with a little snack” (or something along those lines) as in “Would you like to fika with me?” and “I had a great fika this afternoon.”  I remember thinking, this is incredibly charming.  I instantly realized that this is what the break rooms are really meant for in corporate buildings.  We are meant to take breaks from our work at approximately 10:30 and 3:45 to enjoy the exhilarating refreshment of a caffeinated beverage compounded with the sugary rush of a small chocolate roll!  I get it!  I. WILL. FIKA!

Fika seems to be like a more elaborate version of the Yiddish nosh.  Fika is a bona-fide social institution in Sweden (people don’t play when it comes to their breaks).  According to Culinary Cultures of Europe by Stephen Mennell, the fika is an important part of everyday Swedish life as it provides a chance to say hi to your mother, take that cute guy from the elevator on a date, and tell your buddies about your new motorcycle.  Even government employees are known to take breaks from work to fika.  Fikas are what we Americans traditionally think of as the “coffee date” (ie precursor to the tension-filled drinks or high-pressured stakes of dinner), but function even better as “non-date dates.”

This being said, the fika is no light-hearted matter if you’re a host…

Continue reading Fika Fridays: What the Fika?

A few blocks away, Jin Ramen awaits

Jin Ramen from Amanda Tien on Vimeo.

Last semester, my friend Gavin said he knew a place that I’d love.  As many people are, I was very ecstatic to learn that something I would love was about to come into my life.  That week, we went up with some friends to Jin Ramen.  Jin Ramen is also commonly known as my new paradise and my place of choice to take out of town visitors.  Many people are aware of the current ramen craze hitting New York, courtesy of David Chang’s Momofuku restaurants.  I went to Momofuku, and while it’s definitely a great place, I have to say…I prefer Jin Ramen.

It’s not just because Jin Ramen is closer, but the noodles and broth are consistently top notch.   My favorite dish is the Tonokutsu Ramen–creamy pork broth topped with Chashu (braised pork belly), Nitamago (soft-boiled egg), Menma (bamboo shoots), Nori (roasted seaweed), and Negi (fresh scallion).  Pork is a speciality of Fukuoka, a city on the Japanese island of Kyushu.  Thus, the Tonokutsu dishes in particular reflect the flavors and specialties of this southern island.

Continue reading A few blocks away, Jin Ramen awaits

The Philosophical Dilemma of Modern Day Eating/Puppy Chow


Amanda is going camping and thus is posting the usual summer Friday post a bit early.  Play the video, watch her mind flounder, and check out the recipe for one of her favorite childhood snacks.

Hello my friends.  I’ve written this post because it has come to my attention that our society is struggling.  Why?  Because whilst attempting to brainstorm delicious and delectable foods to eat on my camping trip, I could think of nothing that did not require the aid of refridgeration and a fire.  What has our world come to, that I (as a reasonably intelligent person with a background in voracious eating) could not think of anything that would not require the tools that technology has provided?  In summation…what the hell am I supposed to eat?

Here’s the skinny: I am going to Firefly Festival, a three day music extravaganza.  Sounds awesome, and yes, I’m very excited.  But this also marks my first foray into the wilderness (campgrounds) armed with nothing but my bare hands (and a sleeping bag) to pit myself against nature (there are trees in Delaware).  There’s two problems here: one, this film is my frame of reference for camping and two, I’m getting a bit picky about my camp food.  I think I’ve grown a lot in the past few years when it comes to being a picky eater.  As Matt and Kelcey remember, I ate crayfish for the first time, even though I was very, very scared.  Yet in spite of this emotional and mental development as a young adult, I felt the petulance and intolerance of a seven year old rising up within me.  “No, I will NOT have PB&J for three days straight!”  So like any college student with a problem, I took it to the experts.  I went on Facebook.

Continue reading The Philosophical Dilemma of Modern Day Eating/Puppy Chow

Easy, Breezy, Beautiful – Caprese

 

The title of this post is in part reference to one of the most hyped up prizes for America’s Next Top Model (and this catchy rap from a 1998 Tyra Banks commercial), but I’m actually starting off the summer by writing about one of the easiest, lightest summer recipes I know.  Caprese. What is commonly referred to as simply “caprese” originates from the formal title Insalata Caprese, or a salad in the style of the southern Italian island of Capri of the Campania region.  It traditionally consists of sliced fresh buffalo mozzarella, tomatoes, and basil, seasoned with sea salt and olive oil.  It’s usually served as an antipasto, or starter, rather than a side dish with a main course.

What’s fantastic about caprese is that you can eat it in a variety of different ways, so leftovers are definitely a gift.  Here are some of my favorite ways to use caprese…   Continue reading Easy, Breezy, Beautiful – Caprese

Event: Erotic Cake Competition – The Winning Master Bakers

“Let them eat cake.” This phrase is popularly attributed to Marie Antoinette as a highbrow, ignorant response to a bread shortage among the peasant community. While there is some doubt over the validity of this quote, Culinary Society upped the ante of the saying with, “Let them eat SEXY cake.” On the evening of February 8, Culinary Society returned from its three year hiatus to the Erotic Cake Competition. Yes, that does mean sex and cake, and yes, those are some of college students’ favorite things. We at Culinary Society are fully confident in this statement as more than a hundred students attended the Erotic Cake Competition to compete, taste, and indulge throughout the night.  It was one of our biggest turnouts to an event, and the future looks promising for more Erotic Cake Competitions.

There were a lot of fantastic entries to the Erotic Cake Competition to win $75 worth of organic Dagoba chocolate, courtesy of Good Housekeeping. Sensual and tasty baked goods were delivered by teams shortly before students hoping to get as much free cake as possible anxiously filled the room. First, a shout to all of our competitors – Smokin’ Hot, Happy Valentine’s Day, the Lazers, the Sexy Spinsters, Yeast Infection, Have Our Cake & Eat It Too!, The Aphrodisiakers, Delta Tao Sigma, the Pirates of Captain Jack, and Doggie Punches! You all were great, and it was wonderful to have so many options to choose from. Cake judging was based on three criteria: taste, originality/appearance, and sexiness. The judges consisted of Claire, co-president of Culinary Society; me (Amanda), photographer/blogger and hopeful taste tester in Culinary Society; and Easton, a model for C-Spot and a sex archaeologist (I know, too cool.) And now, for the cakes, photos, recipes, and videos… Continue reading Event: Erotic Cake Competition – The Winning Master Bakers

Event: Thanksgiving Pie Night!

Celebrate (hopefully) your last night on campus before you leave for home for Thanksgiving by coming to the East Ramp in Lerner Hall for a night of delicious pies with the Columbia Culinary Society.  We will be serving up traditional favorites in addition to some creative updates.  We’ll be featuring five different Thanksgiving pies: Macademia-Coconut Tart, Blueberry-Cranberry Pie, Pumpkin Pie, Apple-Sour Cream Pie, and Pecan Pie.  The event is open to everyone (no RSVP needed!) so stop by starting at 9:00PM tomorrow, November 23, with your friends.   Additionally, check out our attempt to make a cooking show like demonstration of Matt’s Macademia-Coconut Tart entitled “At the Table” below.

Matt Bakes a Pie

Anyway – come to pie night!  It will be amazing.

[Amanda]

Ravioli Night!

You definitely missed out if you weren’t at Matt Powell’s EC Suite for at least part of last night.  Some arrived early to make the dough (various types, such as spinach and beet) and flatten it out.  Others began to make the different kinds of fillings, like ricotta cheese and sausage or sweet potato.  With a music playlist ranging from Lady Gaga to John Mayer, the atmosphere in the suite was full of energy.  It was nice, warm, and comforting inside Matt’s suite while New York became drenched in a downpour of rain outside.   About twenty people had their own individual stations at the “table” (one dining room table + two desks lined up in the center of the suite).  Everyone was laughing and talking about their previous ravioli memories.

Ravioli Night was one of several events in Culinary Society’s “Italian Month.”  Rachelle led the evening, directing the preparation, creating, and cooking of the ravioli.  Many people brought Tupperware containers to bring home their creations (although a lot of people just ended up cooking their ravioli in Matt’s kitchen and eating it right then and there…like me.)  Beginners laughed over their  misshapen pasta and experts mixed doughs to create exotic looking ravioli.  There is something completely satisfying about making your own food, cooking it a few minutes later, and being able to enjoy it.

Below, you’ll find Rachelle’s Ravioli Madness Recipe.  Additionally, enjoy the photos and this impromptu video documentary I made last night. (:

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With all ravioli, stretch the dough out into a small sheet (flour your hands and the dough to keep it from sticking to you).  Place small balls of filling about two inches apart from each other down the length of the dough sheet.  Fold the dough over and press it down around the balls of filling.  Use a sharp knife to cut apart the ravioli and trim the edges.  Press down the dough to seal the filling inside.  Use a fork to make pretty indents/further solidify the ravioli.  To cook, put finished ravioli into boiling pot of water and wait until the ravioli rise to the top.  Eat alone, with melted butter, or sauce. :)

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Be Rockin them Beets

Beet Pasta

1 1/2 pounds beets (2 to 2 1/2-inches around), washed and dried

1 tablespoon salt

2 tablespoons olive oil

3 eggs

4 cups all-purpose unbleached flour

Cut beets in half and lay on an oiled cookie sheet. Roast at 375 for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until beets are tender.

Allow to cool and peel the beets. Process in a food processor or mash until a pulp

Add salt and eggs to mashed beets

Kitchenaid—Slowly add beet and egg mixture to flour at low speed with the dough hook attachment. Work until dough is soft, pliable and not sticky (5-7 minutes). Cover dough and let rest for at least 30 minutes before rolling.

Hand method—Pile flour on a clean surface making a well in the center. Pour beet and egg mixture into the well. With a fork, slowly incorporate flour into the mixture, being careful not to break the walls. When most of the flour is combined, continue kneading by hand until dough is springy and not sticky. Allow to rest for 30 minutes before rolling.

Filling

3 large onions—to caramelize

Olive oil

Salt

Goat cheese

Slice onions into small, evenly-sized pieces and toss with olive oil and salt. Cook on medium-low heat for 45 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes to caramelize.

When cooled, mix onions with goat cheese. 

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Spinach is good for you…it tastes like it, too

Spinach Pasta

1 package frozen spinach

3 eggs

Salt

2 tablespoons Olive oil

4 cups all-purpose flour

Microwave spinach and squeeze out water. Process in a food processor.

Add eggs, salt, and olive oil, to spinach. Mix well.

Kitchenaid—Slowly add spinach and egg mixture to flour at low speed with the dough hook attachment. Work until dough is soft, pliable and not sticky (5-7 minutes). Cover dough and let rest for at least 30 minutes before rolling.

Hand method—Pile flour on a clean surface making a well in the center. Pour spinach and egg mixture into the well. With a fork, slowly incorporate flour into the mixture, being careful not to break the walls. When most of the flour is combined, continue kneading by hand until dough is springy and not sticky. Allow to rest for 30 minutes before rolling.

Filling

32oz ricotta

Decent amount of delicious sausage (Rachelle’s words… 😉 )

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Ain’t You a Sweet Potato

Semolina pasta

2 cups all-purpose flour

2 cups semolina flour

1 pinch salt

6 large eggs

2 tablespoons olive oil

Kitchenaid— Mix all-purpose, semolina flours, and salt at low speed. Slowly add egg and oil to flour at low speed with the dough hook attachment. Work until dough is soft, pliable and not sticky (5-7 minutes). Cover dough and let rest for at least 30 minutes before rolling.

Hand method— Mix all-purpose, semolina flours, and salt in a bowl. Pile flour mixture on a clean surface making a well in the center. Crack whole eggs into the well and add oil. With a fork, slowly incorporate flour into the mixture, being careful not to break the walls. When most of the flour is combined, continue kneading by hand until dough is springy and not sticky. Allow to rest for 30 minutes before rolling.

Filling—Sweet potato with sage browned butter

2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch pieces

1 teaspoon salt

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 teaspoons fresh sage—whole leaves

Boil sweet potatoes until tender. Strain and add 1 teaspoon salt.

While potatoes are cooking, prepare browned butter. Cook butter with whole sage leaves on medium heat, stirring constantly. Remove from heat when butter turns a light tan. Pour into extra bowl or cup immediately; the butter will continue to cook if left in pan. Mash potatoes with butter.  Remove sage leaves and mix into potatoes.

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Thanks for another great night, CUCS. :)  Recipes by Rachelle Grossman.

[Photos, video, post by Amanda.]